Tag Archives: cooking

Sweet(den) potato fries.

This recipe is the perfect hangover cure. It’s super simple, really cheap to make, fairly unhealthy and tastes damn delicious.

SPOILER ALERT: This isn’t actually Swedish at all. Although Swedes do love chilibearnaisesås – and so do I.

Roughly 2 servings (1 serving per potato)

INGREDIENTS

2 sweet potatoes

2 cloves of garlic

2 tablespoons of olive oil

salt and pepper

mixed herbs

pre-made chili bearnaise sauce (most supermarkets)

Preheat oven to 220 Celcius – line baking tray

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STEP 1

Peel sweet potatoes. Don’t peel your fingers.

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STEP 2

Slice lengthways. Don’t slice your fingers.

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STEP 3

Slice into fries. Don’t slice your fingers.

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STEP 4

Cut garlic finely. Don’t cut your fingers.

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STEP 5

Mix fries, garlic, salt, pepper and herbs in mixing bowl. Drizzle with olive oil.

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STEP 6

Place on baking tray evenly. Cook for 15 mins on middle oven shelf. Turn fries to ensure even crisp. Cook for further 15mins.

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STEP 7

Serve with chili bearnaise sauce, friends, films and a beer (hair of the dog optional). Enjoy.

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Swedish Microwave Matrix

It is very interesting to notice a variety of microwave matrices on campus. They are typically 2×4, 3×4 and occasionally 4×4. At 12 o’clock, these matrices light up. I really should cook more regularly. I admire the Swedish student’s self-independence. Most of my Swedish friends cook their meals and bring them in a bright coloured plastic container for lunch.

(In my defence, I sold my life to Chalmers Formula Student. I barely sleep, never mind cook.)

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The good thing about studying at Chalmers is the fact that education does not interfere with one’s personal life. The student-life feels like a “job”. In fact, Swedish students get paid by their government to study. It is pretty much an “8 to 5” type of job. Last class finishes at 5PM and the campus empties. It is the polar opposite compared to Canada, where the campus is where the “happening” is. Or actually, you are just spending days and nights in the computer labs.

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Swedish students tend to live alone in their apartments, whereas in Canada a house is typically shared between 4~7 people. Francesca Martin wrote a little blurb about the housing situation in Uppsala. It is also true here at Göteborg. I am currently sharing a SGS international student-housing apartment with three other international students: one Spaniard, one Italian, one French (we are following every football league in the house). Due to renovation reasons, I am moving after the 2015 New Year to my own 29 m^2 apartment. I am looking forward to having my own space, where I clean after my own mess. Like everywhere, the shared house gets messy after a while.